Already, still and yet

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Already, still and yet

Post  axel on Sun Jul 29, 2012 10:13 am

Already, still and yet

The three common adverbs already, still and yet can be tricky to get right.

What does the speaker mean in the sentences below?

- Are you already in the bathroom?
- Are you still in the bathroom?
- Are you in the bathroom yet?

Already is used to say that something has happened earlier than expected.

- Are you already in the bathroom? I thought you wanted to have breakfast first.

Already usually goes before the main verb:

- I've already had breakfast.

Still is used to say that something has not finished — surprisingly (or even annoyingly).

- Are you still in the bathroom? Can you hurry up? I have to go to work!

Still usually goes before the main verb, just like already:

- Sorry! I'm still trying to get my contact lenses in!

In questions, we use yet to ask whether something expected has happened.

- Are you in the bathroom yet? It's 20 past seven — we have to leave in ten minutes!

Yet goes at the end of a question.

Yet can also go at the end of a negative sentence to say that something has not happened but we think it will.

- I haven't been to the bathroom yet. I didn't realize it was so late.

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