Prepositions

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Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Sat Mar 17, 2012 5:46 am


Recognize a preposition when you see one.
Prepositions are the words that indicate location. Usually, prepositions show this location in the physical world.

Prepositions can also show location in time. Read the next three examples:

At midnight, Jill craved mashed potatoes with grape jelly.

In the spring, I always vow to plant tomatoes but end up buying them at the supermarket.

During the marathon, Iggy's legs complained with sharp pains shooting up his thighs.


At midnight, in the spring, and during the marathon all show location in time.

Because there are so many possible locations, there are quite a few prepositions. Below is the complete list.

PREPOSITIONS:

about
above
according to
across
after
against
along
along with
among
apart from
around
as
as for
at
because of
before
behind
below
beneath
beside
between
beyond
but*
by
by means of
concerning
despite
down
during
except
except for
excepting
for
from
in
in addition to
in back of
in case of
in front of
in place of
inside
in spite of
instead of
into
like
near
next
of
off
on
onto
on top of
out
out of
outside
over
past
regarding
round
since
through
throughout
till
to
toward
under
underneath
unlike
until
up
upon
up to
with
within
without


"But" is very seldom a preposition. When it is used as a preposition, but means the same as "except"
Ex: "Everyone ate frog legs but Jamie. But usually functions as a coordinating conjunction."

Understand how to form a prepositional phrase:

Prepositions generally introduce prepositional phrases. Prepositional phrases look like this:

preposition + optional modifiers + noun, pronoun, or gerund

Here are some examples:

At school

At = preposition; school = noun.

According to us

According to
= preposition; us = pronoun.

By chewing

By = preposition; chewing = gerund.

Under the stove

Under = preposition; the = modifier; stove = noun.

In the crumb-filled, rumpled sheets

In = preposition; the, crumb-filled, rumpled = modifiers; sheets = noun.

Realize that some prepositions also function as subordinate conjunctions.

Some prepositions also function as subordinate conjunctions. These prepositions are after, as, before, since, and until. A subordinate conjunction will have both a subject and a verb following it, forming a subordinate clause.

Look at these examples:

After Sam and Esmerelda kissed goodnight

After = subordinate conjunction; Sam, Esmerelda = subjects; kissed = verb.

As Jerome buckled on the parachute

As = subordinate conjunction; Jerome = subject; buckled = verb.

Before I eat these frog legs

Before = subordinate conjunction; I = subject; eat = verb.

Since we have enjoyed the squid eyeball stew

Since = subordinate conjunction; we = subject; have enjoyed = verb.

Until your hiccups stop

Until = subordinate conjunction; hiccups = subject; stop = verb.

If you find a noun [with or without modifiers] following one of these five prepositions, then all you have is a prepositional phrase. Look at these examples:

After the killer calculus test

After = preposition; the, killer, calculus = modifiers; test = noun.

As a good parent

As = preposition; a, good = modifiers; parent = noun.

Before dinner

Before = preposition; dinner = noun.

Since the breakup

Since = preposition; the = modifier; breakup = noun.

Until midnight

Until = preposition; midnight = noun.



http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/preposition.htm
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Thu Jul 26, 2012 5:56 am

Prepositions are short words (on, in, to) that usually stand in front of nouns (sometimes also in front of gerund verbs).

Even advanced learners of English find prepositions difficult, as a 1:1 translation is usually not possible. One preposition in your native language might have several translations depending on the situation.

There are hardly any rules as to when to use which preposition. The only way to learn prepositions is looking them up in a dictionary, reading a lot in English (literature) and learning useful phrases off by heart (study tips).

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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:16 am





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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Wed Sep 19, 2012 6:11 am

A preposition is a word which shows relationships among other words in the sentence. The relationships include direction, place, time, cause, manner and amount. In the sentence "She went to the store", "to" is a preposition which shows direction. In the sentence "He came by bus", "by" is a preposition which shows manner. In the sentence "They will be here at three o'clock", "at" is a preposition which shows time and in the sentence "It is under the table", "under" is a preposition which shows place.

A preposition always goes with a noun or pronoun which is called the object of the preposition. The preposition is almost always before the noun or pronoun and that is why it is called a preposition. The preposition and the object of the preposition together are called a prepositional phrase.



http://eslus.com/LESSONS/GRAMMAR/POS/pos7.htm
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Wed Sep 19, 2012 6:16 am


http://www.detailenglish.com/uploads/image/prep3bx1.jpg
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Sat Oct 27, 2012 12:28 pm

GRAMMAR - What is a Preposition?

A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition.

A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to the rest of the sentence as in the following examples:

The book is on the table.
The book is beneath the table.
The book is leaning against the table.
The book is beside the table.
She held the book over the table.
She read the book during class.


In each of the preceding sentences, a preposition locates the noun "book" in space or in time.

A prepositional phrase is made up of the preposition, its object and any associated adjectives or adverbs. A prepositional phrase can function as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. The most common prepositions are "about," "above," "across," "after," "against," "along," "among," "around," "at," "before," "behind," "below," "beneath," "beside," "between," "beyond," "but," "by," "despite," "down," "during," "except," "for," "from," "in," "inside," "into," "like," "near," "of," "off," "on," "onto," "out," "outside," "over," "past," "since," "through," "throughout," "till," "to," "toward," "under," "underneath," "until," "up," "upon," "with," "within," and "without."

Each of the highlighted words in the following sentences is a preposition:

"The children climbed the mountain without fear."

In this sentence, the preposition "without" introduces the noun "fear." The prepositional phrase "without fear" functions as an adverb describing how the children climbed.

"There was rejoicing throughout the land when the government was defeated."


Here, the preposition "throughout" introduces the noun phrase "the land." The prepositional phrase acts as an adverb describing the location of the rejoicing.

"The spider crawled slowly along the banister."


The preposition "along" introduces the noun phrase "the banister" and the prepositional phrase "along the banister" acts as an adverb, describing where the spider crawled.

"The dog is hiding under the porch because it knows it will be punished for chewing up a new pair of shoes."

Here the preposition "under" introduces the prepositional phrase "under the porch," which acts as an adverb modifying the compound verb "is hiding."

"The screenwriter searched for the manuscript he was certain was somewhere in his office."

Similarly in this sentence, the preposition "in" introduces a prepositional phrase "in his office," which acts as an adverb describing the location of the missing papers.


http://www.writingcentre.uottawa.ca/hypergrammar/preposit.html
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Tue Jan 15, 2013 6:51 pm

What is a Preposition?

A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition.

A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to the rest of the sentence as in the following examples:

"The book is on the table."
"The book is beneath the table."
"The book is leaning against the table."
"The book is beside the table."
"She held the book over the table."
"She read the book during class."


In each of the preceding sentences, a preposition locates the noun "book" in space or in time.

A prepositional phrase is made up of the preposition, its object and any associated adjectives or adverbs. A prepositional phrase can function as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. The most common prepositions are "about," "above," "across," "after," "against," "along," "among," "around," "at," "before," "behind," "below," "beneath," "beside," "between," "beyond," "but," "by," "despite," "down," "during," "except," "for," "from," "in," "inside," "into," "like," "near," "of," "off," "on," "onto," "out," "outside," "over," "past," "since," "through," "throughout," "till," "to," "toward," "under," "underneath," "until," "up," "upon," "with," "within," and "without."

Each of the highlighted words in the following sentences is a preposition:

"The children climbed the mountain without fear."

In this sentence, the preposition "without" introduces the noun "fear." The prepositional phrase "without fear" functions as an adverb describing how the children climbed.

"There was rejoicing throughout the land when the government was defeated."

Here, the preposition "throughout" introduces the noun phrase "the land." The prepositional phrase acts as an adverb describing the location of the rejoicing.

"The spider crawled slowly along the banister."

The preposition "along" introduces the noun phrase "the banister" and the prepositional phrase "along the banister" acts as an adverb, describing where the spider crawled.

"The dog is hiding under the porch because it knows it will be punished for chewing up a new pair of shoes."[/b]

Here the preposition "under" introduces the prepositional phrase "under the porch," which acts as an adverb modifying the compound verb "is hiding."

[i]"The screenwriter searched for the manuscript he was certain was somewhere in his office."


Similarly in this sentence, the preposition "in" introduces a prepositional phrase "in his office," which acts as an adverb describing the location of the missing papers.


http://www.writingcentre.uottawa.ca/hypergrammar/preposit.html
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Sun Jun 30, 2013 12:30 pm

What is a Preposition?
Expressing Relationships of Words

A preposition is a kind of connector for it expresses the relationship of the noun or pronoun that were used to other words in the sentence. This relationship may express a location, direction, time, cause or possession. The position that a preposition holds in a sentence then is significant for it establishes a particular relationship.


http://schoolsquestiontime.org/what-is-a-preposition/
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Tue Nov 05, 2013 9:09 am


http://aliciateacher2.wordpress.com/grammar/prepositions/
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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Thu Nov 07, 2013 2:30 pm

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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:49 am


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Re: Prepositions

Post  Vincent Law on Sat Nov 09, 2013 9:16 am



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